Serving Southeast Michigan since 1998
888-883-5449
agherfi@gmail.com

Inspected Once, Inspected Right

Environmental testing for Radon, Mold, Lead and Asbestos

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888-883-5449

Address:

Americana Home Inspection, Inc.
8552 Sherwood Dr.
Grosse Ile, MI
48138 – 3002

Home Inspection Experts

Buying a new house is likely one of the largest purchase decisions you’ll ever make. The whole process is fraught with emotion and stress. A professional home inspection will substantially reduce the risk for your large investment in a new home. It just makes sense to learn as much as you can about the quality of your new home, before signing off on everything.

Go in with Peace of Mind

Inspector Service

Our home inspection service is a visual inspection of the structural elements and systems which are accessible. This typically includes:
Foundation
Roofing
Exterior, walls, siding, etc.
Porches and decks
Attic
Electrical systems
Plumbing systems
Interior
Doors and windows
Heating and air conditioning systems
Ventilation
Fireplaces
We strongly encourage you to accompany the inspector so that you may ask questions and gain a better understanding of the systems in the home.
If you have any questions, or are interested in any other services, please contact us so we may discuss your needs.

Building a New Home

Building a new home is a tremendously complex endeavor. It involves many people, usually split up into subcontractor groups, each working on different parts and systems of the house. Even for the best builders, it’s nearly impossible to complete this process without missing something. Maybe it’s a plumbing fixture that didn’t get tested for leaks. Maybe it’s an electrical box that isn’t working or any one of dozens of minor problems that can easily be overlooked in such a major undertaking. We will find such problems while it is still early enough for you to bring them up with the builder and have them corrected before you sign off and start moving in.

Inspector Service

Our home inspection service is a visual inspection of the structural elements and systems which are accessible. This typically includes:
Foundation
Roofing
Exterior, walls, siding, etc.
Porches and decks
Attic
Electrical systems
Plumbing systems
Interior
Doors and windows
Heating and air conditioning systems
Ventilation
Fireplaces
We strongly encourage you to accompany the inspector so that you may ask questions and gain a better understanding of the systems in the home.
If you have any questions, or are interested in any other services, please contact us so we may discuss your needs.

What is an Inspection?

The home buying process can be confusing and stressful. Not only do you need to consider things such as price and location, you also have to worry about whether the house itself has any hidden problems that could become costly surprises down the road. As professional Home Inspectors, it’s our job to look for those hidden problems for you. The home inspection is an unbiased, professional assessment of the condition of the house. It provides you an expert opinion and professional report on the condition of the physical structure and various systems within a house, giving you peace of mind on what is likely the largest purchase you’ll ever make.

Comprehensive Inspections

In order to prepare the report, an inspector must conduct a visual inspection of the house. The inspection process typically takes about three hours to complete. This, of course, may vary according to the size and condition of the home. We strongly encourage you to accompany the inspector during the inspection. This will give you a chance to ask questions and become familiar with the systems of the home. We will inspect all the structural elements and systems of the home. 

Inspector Service

Our home inspection service is a visual inspection of the structural elements and systems which are accessible. We will assess for environmental issues, plumbing concerns, if there is mold in the home and more.

Most Common Problems

No house is perfect. Even the best built and best maintained homes will always have a few items in less than perfect condition. 

How to Prepare for an Inspection

No home is perfect. Anything from major damage to minor maintenance issues are often found. Even new homes are not immune – they could have problems with the plumbing, electrical system, heating and cooling system, or the roofing system, just to name a few.

Homeowners

For homeowners, it’s important to be aware of any issues your home may have prior to putting it on the market. Getting a prelisting home inspection will ensure that you’re aware of any problems and can take care of them on your terms – or present them as-is and adjust your selling price proportionally. The alternative leaves you open to costly surprises and delays, and even potential deal-breakers once you’ve entered negotiations with the buyer.

Buyers

For buyers, an inspection is vital to uncovering issues a home may have but are invisible to the untrained eye. Even if the inspection finds more problems than you’re comfortable with and you move on to a different home to start the process all over again, it’s money well spent. An inspection will give you the opportunity to ask the seller to make the repairs before you buy, or to back out of the contract. So be sure to ask for the “inspection contingency” when you begin to enter negotiations with the seller. This allows you to set a limit on the cost of repairs to the home. If the inspector estimates that repairs will cost more than the limit, the contract is voided. It is a good way to protect yourself from ending up with a home that requires repairs that you are unable or unwilling to pay for.

Before the Inspection

Before the inspector arrives, there are a few things you should know. There are no federal regulations governing inspectors. The laws are going to differ state by state. Therefore it’s important to interview your inspector or inspection company prior to hiring them. Since each state is going to have their own standards of certification for inspectors – and some don’t even have any – credibility is a big issue in choosing the right inspector. Ask what certifications your inspector holds and what associations he or she belongs to. Most associations such as the American Society of Home Inspectors (ASHI), National Association of Certified Home Inspectors (NACHI), and National Association of Home Inspectors, Inc. (NAHI) have membership requirements that include minimum levels of experience and training as well as codes of ethics. There are also several state-level associations that your inspector may be a member of. Ask your inspector and then visit the association’s website.

During the Inspection

Once your inspector has arrived, it is recommended that you accompany him or her on the inspection of the property. This is so you can become familiar with the home and its systems as well as exactly what repairs the inspector recommends and why. You might also want to prepare a list of items that you’ve seen in the home that you feel are cause for concern as well as any questions you may have. The inspection is a great time to find out where the home’s water and gas shutoffs are and where the fuse box is.

Here are some other suggestions for homeowners –

Accessibility: Make sure that all areas of the home are accessible, especially to the attic and crawl space. It’s also a good idea to trim any trees and shrubs that may make an inspection of the exterior of the property difficult.
Housekeeping: The inspector may photograph your home for the inspection report, so clearing the clutter and moving vehicles from the front of the home will help the inspection go smoother.
Maintenance: Repair minor things like leaky faucets, missing door handles and trim.

Inspector Service

Our home inspection service is a visual inspection of the structural elements and systems which are accessible. This typically includes, but not limited to:

Exterior

Foundations, walls, siding, etc.

Roofing

Roofing materials are the single most common defect we find. Usually it doesn’t mean the roof needs replaced, but simply that it is in need of maintenance or repair.

Interior

Fireplaces, ventilation, attic

Home Systems

Electrical, plumbing, heating and air conditioning systems

Schedule an Inspection:

Communication is important to us. Please contact us if you have any questions or inquiries.

Most Common Problems

No house is perfect. Even the best built and best maintained homes will always have a few items in less than perfect condition. Below are some of the items we most commonly find when inspecting a home:

Roofing Problems

Roofing materials are the single most common defect we find. Usually it doesn’t mean the roof needs replaced, but simply that it is in need of maintenance or repair. This can result in ceiling stains, as well as other issues.

Get Started!

Electrical hazards

Most common in older homes, but often found in newer homes as well. Electrical hazards come in many forms, from ungrounded outlets to wiring done incorrectly by the homeowner.

Rotted Wood

Caused by being wet for extended periods of time, most commonly found around tubs, showers and toilets inside, or roof eaves and trim outside.

Water Heaters, Gas Furnaces and Plumbing Defects

Many water heaters are not installed in compliance with plumbing code. Most gas furnaces seem to be in need of routine maintenance. Plumbing issues commonly found include dripping faucets, leaking fixtures, slow drains, etc. Even in brand new homes, it is common to identify minor plumbing defects.

Winterize Your Home

Whether you are buying or selling a home, you should have a professional home inspection performed. A home inspection will look at the systems that make up the building such as
structural elements, foundation, framing, plumbing systems, roofing, electrical systems, cosmetic condition, paint, siding, etc.

Inside Your Home

Have your furnace system serviced to ensure it’s working efficiently and not emitting carbon monoxide.
Clean permanent furnace filters and replace paper or disposable filters.
Replace the batteries in smoke and carbon monoxide detectors.
If you have a wood stove or fireplace, have your chimney swept thoroughly. It should be cleaned before the soot build up reaches one-fourth inch thickness inside the chimney flue.
Check your hot water heater for leaks and maintain proper temperature setting (120 degrees recommended by Department of Energy). On older water heaters with less insulation, for every 10 degrees Fahrenheit you lower the temperature, you save 6 percent of your water heating energy.
Check the attic to see if insulation needs to be added or replaced. This is the most significant area of heat loss in many homes, so it is also important to see that it has proper ventilation. Inadequate ventilation could lead to premature deterioration of the insulation materials. You may also need to check insulation in exterior walls, crawl spaces and along foundation walls.
Check all windows and doors for air leaks. Install storm windows and putty, caulk or add weather stripping as needed.
Check basement and cellars for seal cracks or leaks in walls and floor.
Make sure all vents are clean and operating properly.
Clean and vacuum baseboard heaters, heating ducts and vents. Remove or winterize air conditioning units.

Outside Your Home

Store or cover outdoor furniture, toys and grill.
Purchase rock salt for melting snow and a shovel or snow blower if you don’t already have one.
Make sure you have the right kind of gas and oil on hand for your snow blower in the case of an unexpected snowstorm.
Caulk joints and minor cracks on exterior walls and siding.
Look for deteriorating finishes. Minor problems can be patched to preserve the wood. Put bigger jobs, such as scraping and refinishing painted or stained areas, on the calendar for next spring or early summer.
Drain and shut off sprinkler systems and other exterior water lines to avoid frozen and broken pipes. Leave all taps slightly open.
Insulate exterior spigots and other pipes that are subject to freezing but can’t be drained or shut off.
Rake and compost leaves and garden debris, or put out for yard-waste pickup.
Clean storm drains, gutters and other drain pipes.
Check the foundation for proper drainage. To do this, spray yard with a hose to see if water runs away from the house. A little shoveling to reshape the earth next to the house may make the water run away from the foundation.

RESIDENTIAL INVESTMENT

Investing in residential property? Protect yourself against illegal “flipping.” When you’re considering investing in rehabilitated residential property, you’re making a smart choice

“Flipping” a property

Often, people and companies that sell rehabilitated real estate buy a dilapidated property, put a lot of money and sweat equity into it to make it attractive to a buyer, and then reap the reward when the property is sold for a lot more than the original buyer paid for it. There’s nothing wrong with this. Quite the contrary, it makes more housing available at a time when it’s in demand. And as noted, it’s often a good investment choice for the eventual buyer.

Inspect before “flipping”!

But before you invest in a rehabilitated property, you should obtain a professional inspection, from an inspector with your interests in mind. Too often lately, homes are “flipped” for considerably more than they were recently paid for without any substantial improvements to justify the higher price. Let alone having those improvements tested to confirm their operability. You’d be the one left holding the bag. Shouldn’t you have someone on your side making sure that the property you’re buying is indeed in good condition?

Protect Yourself!

It’s easy to protect yourself. Hire a professional inspector to ensure the property and its improvements are up to your standards. If you’re buying more than one property at a time from the same buyer, it’s even more important to have them inspected by a professional working for you, instead of another party to the transaction. There are cost effective ways to protect yourself when investing in many properties. With the expertise of a licensed home inspector, you should be able to buy with the confidence that everything is as represented by the seller.

Benefits of an Inspection

It’s smart to always have an inspection done before closing on a property. An inspector will tell you if everything that is present in the structure is functioning properly, what repairs may need to still be done, and whether there are any safety or soundness issues with the property. We will work as your advocate in the transaction, with your interests in mind.

As an investor, you need and deserve to know the property you are purchasing. Protect your interests with the help of a professional inspector.

Code of Ethics

As a member of the National Association of Certified Home Inspectors (NACHI), I adhere to a strict code of ethics as a home inspector. The code of ethics, as of 12/27/2004 appears below. (source: the National Association of Certified Home Inspectors )
1.11 revised October 31, 2004

High Standards

The National Association of Certified Home Inspectors (NACHI) promotes a high standard of professionalism, business ethics and inspection procedures. NACHI members subscribe to the following Code of Ethics in the course of their business.


Questions and comments should be directed to Joe Farsetta, Ethics and Standard of Practice Committee Chairperson email .
This document is subject to change without notice. Check NACHI
frequently for changes.

Duty to the Public

1. The NACHI Inspector shall abide by the Code of Ethics and substantially follow the NACHI Standards of Practice.
2. The NACHI inspector will not engage in any practices that could be damaging to the public or bring discredit to the home inspection industry.
3. The NACHI Inspector shall be fair, honest, impartial, and act in good faith in dealing with the public.
4. The NACHI Inspector will not discriminate in any business activities on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, familial status, sexual orientation, or handicap and shall comply with all federal, state and local laws concerning discrimination.
5. The NACHI Inspector shall be truthful regarding his/her services & qualifications.
6. The NACHI Inspector will have no undisclosed conflict of interest with the client, nor will the NACHI Inspector accept or offer any undisclosed commissions, rebates, profits, or other benefit.
7. The NACHI Inspector will not communicate any information about an inspection to anyone except the client without the prior written consent of the client, except where it may affect the safety of others or violates a law or statute.
8. The NACHI Inspector shall always act in the interest of the client, unless doing so violates a law, statute, or this Code of Ethics.
9. The NACHI Inspector shall use a written contract that specifies the services to be performed, limitations of services, and fees.
10. The NACHI Inspector shall comply with all government rules and licensing requirements of the jurisdiction where he/she conduct business.
11. The NACHI inspector shall not perform or offer to perform, for an additional fee, any repairs or associated services to structure on which the inspector or inspector’s company has prepared a home inspection report, for a period of 12 months. This provision shall not include services to components and/or systems which are not included in the NACHI standards of practice.

Duty to Continue Education

1. The NACHI Inspector will comply with NACHI’s current Continuing Education Requirements.
2. The NACHI Inspector shall pass the NACHI’s Online Inspector Exam once every calendar year.
3. Duty to the Profession and NACHI
1. The NACHI Inspector will strive to improve the Home Inspection Industry by sharing his/her lessons and/or experiences for the benefit of all. This does not preclude the Inspector from copyrighting or marketing his/her expertise to other Inspectors or the public in any manner permitted by law.
2. The NACHI Inspector shall assist the NACHI leadership in disseminating and publicizing the benefits of NACHI membership.
3. The NACHI Inspector will not engage in any act or practice that could be deemed damaging, seditious, or destructive to NACHI, fellow NACHI members, NACHI employees, leadership or directors. Member(s) accused of acting or deemed in violation of such rules shall be reviewed by the Ethics committee for possible sanctions and/or expulsion from NACHI.

Environmental Issues

It seems that we hear a lot about environmental concerns these days. Much of it is simply the result of a greater awareness than in the past. Even though there isn’t anything to be concerned with in most homes, there are still a number of potential home environmental issues that buyers should be aware of.

Water Quality

Water quality is probably the most common concern and the one most often tested for. Typically, a basic water quality test will check pH, water hardness, the presence of fluoride, sodium, iron and manganese, plus bacteria such as E-coli. Additionally, water may be tested for the presence of lead or arsenic.

Radon

Another common environmental concern with the home is radon. Radon is a radioactive gas that comes from the natural decay of uranium in the soil. Almost all homes have some radon present, and tests can determine if the level present is higher than what is considered safe. If the level is too high, a radon reduction system will need to be installed.

Lead Paint

In homes built before 1978, lead-based paint may be present. Generally, if the lead-based paint is in good condition, not cracking or peeling, it is not a hazard. If the condition is hazardous, the paint will either need to be removed or sealed in such a manner as to eliminate the hazard.

Asbestos

In older homes built more than 30 years ago, asbestos was used in many types of insulation and other building materials. If the asbestos is releasing fibers into the air, it needs to be removed or repaired by a professional contractor specializing in asbestos cleanup. If the asbestos material is in good repair, and not releasing fibers, it poses no hazard and can be left alone.

Radon Information

There are cracks in the foundation. Nothing structural. Nothing that’s going to threaten the stability of the home, but they’re there. Nooks, crannies and holes through which seeps an invisible threat. Colorless, odorless, and undetectable by your average human, it is nevertheless the second-leading cause of lung cancer in the United States.

Entry Points

Radon gas – even the name sounds ominous, evoking images of radiation and nuclear devastation is created when uranium in the soil decays. The gas then seeps through any access point into a home. Common entry points are cracks in the foundation, poorly-sealed pipes, drainage, or any other loose point. Once in the home, the gas can collect in certain areas especially basements and other low-lying, closed areas and build up over time to dangerous levels. The Environmental Protection Agency of the US Government has set a threshold of 4 pico curies per liter as the safe level. As humans are exposed to the gas over a period of years, it can have a significant and detrimental effect.

Widespread Issue

How widespread is the problem? Radon has been found in homes in all 50 states. Certain areas are more susceptible than others check locations, but no location is immune. Concentrations of radon-causing materials in the soil can be either natural or man-made. Homes built near historic mining operations may be at higher risk. The only way to tell for sure is to have a home tested.

Active and Passive Testing

Testing for radon comes in two forms: active and passive. Active devises constantly measure the levels of radon in a portion of the home and display those results. Passive devices collect samples over a period of time and then are taken away and analyzed. Either method can help you determine your level of risk. Do-it-yourself kits are available from a number of outlets, normally with passive devices. Over a period of days, the device is left in the lowest level of the home which is normally occupied. This eliminates crawl spaces under the house, but includes finished or unfinished basements. Then the results are analyzed by a professional. The other option is to engage a qualified professional to conduct the tests properly. The EPA web site provides information on finding an appropriate resources and testing devices.

Blocking Radon

If high concentrations of radon are found in your home, you have several options. Since radon is only a problem when it is concentrated in high volume, improving the ventilation in an area is often sufficient to solve the problem. In other cases, it may be necessary to limit the amount of radon getting into the home by sealing or otherwise obstructing the access points. Once again, a professional should be engaged to ensure that the radon is effectively blocked. Typical radon mitigation systems can cost between $800 and $2500, according to the EPA.

Know the Risk 

If you’re buying or selling a home, radon can be a significant issue. Buyers should be aware of the radon risk in their area and determine whether a radon test is desirable. When in doubt, the EPA always recommends testing. The cost of the test can be built into the house price. If test results already exist, make sure they are recent or that the home has not been significantly renovated since the test was performed. If in doubt, get a new test done. If you’re selling a home, having a recent radon test is a great idea. By being proactive, you can assure potential buyers that there is no risk and avoid the issue from the start.

More Information

So whether you have an old home or a new one, live in an old mining town or in the middle of the Great Plains, radon is a reality. But it is a reality that we can live with. Proper testing and mitigation can eliminate radon as a health threat. For more information, visit the EPA web site on radon.

Lead in the Home – Warning! This House Could be Hazardous to Your Health!

You’d be hard pressed to sell a home with such a label attached to it. And yet, many older homes in the United States might qualify. You see, prior to 1978, paints and other products containing lead were widely used in homes and offices. Chipping and peeling paint can expose occupants to this hazardous material. In addition, many older plumbing systems utilized lead-based solder to join pipes. This lead can leach into the water, especially when running hot water. In certain areas, high concentrations of lead can even be found in the ground soil.

Health Issues

Unknown in years past, it is now clear that lead causes a number of health-related problems. In children, this can include growth and learning disabilities, headaches, and even brain damage. Adults are not immune either. High levels of lead have been tied to problem pregnancies, high-blood pressure and digestive problems.

Know Before Selling or Buying

Before you buy or sell an older home, you need to know what hazards may exist. If selling, federal law stipulates that you must disclose any lead-based paint in the home. If you’re buying, you want to know what hazards may be lurking in the walls, as well as in the pipes, before you put up your earnest money. If you suspect that a house contains high levels of lead, you should contact a qualified professional to do an inspection. These tradesmen use a range of tools from the well-trained eye to complex, specialized equipment to detect lead levels and recommend appropriate solutions. The National Lead Information Center can help you find a resource.

Cleaning Solutions

Many solutions exist for cleaning up lead concentrations. Depending upon your situation, you may find one of these an adequate solution. Removing lead-based paint, for example, may be more trouble as it is worth. The process of stripping the paint from the walls is likely to create dust and debris which is more likely to be ingested. Given these hazards, you should consult a certified contractor to complete this kind of work. Short of removing the paint, you may be able to get by with covering the old, lead-based paint with a coat of sealant specifically designed for this purpose. Once again, a certified contractor will be able to recommend an appropriate solution. Financial assistance is even available in certain circumstances.

Find Out Before it is Dangerous!

So even though a house may not carry a warning label from the EPA, a little common sense and a sharp eye should keep your family safe.

Plumbing Issues

Plumbing problems usually revolve around one of three things: clogs, leaks, or drips. It pays to be familiar with your plumbing system so you can minimize the damage caused by plumbing problems as well as fix minor problems on your own.

Know the Water Shutoff!

The most important thing you can do is find out where the main water shutoff valve is and how to turn it off. This is usually either outside your home or in your basement or crawlspace. If you cannot find it or don’t know how to turn it off, contact your utility company and have them show you. If any tools are necessary to turn off your water, keep them handy. Being able to shut your water off at the main valve can be vital to reducing damage to your home if a pipe were to burst.

Don’t Forget the Appliances!

You should also check each plumbing appliance (sinks, toilets, etc.) for their own shutoff valves and verify they work. If the valves fail to turn off water to the appliance, you should have them fixed by a professional plumber. These valves come in handy when the need arises to repair individual appliances. If an appliance has no valves, you will need to shut off your water at the main valve to repair it.

Slow Drains

When it comes to clogs and slow drains, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. In the tub or shower, invest in an inexpensive hair trap or screen to prevent the majority of hair and soap scum from going down the drain. In the kitchen, don’t pour cooking grease down your drain. It will harden and coat your pipes with a sticky scum that will catch other particles and eventually clog the pipe. Instead, keep it in a coffee can or milk container and dispose of it with your garbage once it’s cooled. You should also avoid dumping coffee grounds down the drain. They’re notorious for causing clogs.

DIY – Taking Care of Problems

Maintaining your drains on a weekly basis is also a good idea to keep your pipes clear. One way to do this is to pour a half-cup of salt, a half-cup of baking soda and a half-cup of vinegar down the drain and follow with two quarts of boiling water.


If you do encounter a clog, don’t panic. Clogs and slow drains most commonly occur in areas that can be easily cleared on your own without the help of a pro (if more than one drain or toilet is affected, you will need to contact a plumber). First, try a plunger. Repair-Home , has easy to follow instructions for the use of a pipe-snake. There is also the option of using chemical clog removers. Be sure to follow the package instructions when using them.

Managing Clogs and Leaks

Leaks can be slowed or stopped until you’re able to get a plumber out to your home by following the steps on this article: Repairing leaking pipes . Please keep in mind that this is a temporary measure only, but it will help prevent water damage until your plumber fixes the problem.

DIY – Taking Care of Problems

Many plumbing repair projects don’t require the help of a professional. Replacing faucets, garbage disposals, sinks, and toilets are all easily accomplished by the do-it-yourselfer if you have the right tools and information. Do it Yourselfer Website is a great resource for many home repair projects.

Schedule an Inspection and Know for Sure

If you would like a thorough, professional inspection of your plumbing system by an expert, please contact our office. We have the expertise to detect problems invisible to the untrained eye to help you head off problems before they start. We will also provide you with a full report summarizing our findings and recommended course of action if necessary as well as estimated costs of repair.

Mold in the Home

The first thing to understand about mold is that there is a little mold everywhere – indoors and outdoors. It’s in the air and can be found on plants, foods, dry leaves, and other organic materials.
It’s very common to find molds in homes and buildings. After all, molds grow naturally indoors. Mold spores enter the home through doorways, windows, and heating and air conditioning systems. Spores also enter the home on animals, clothing, shoes, bags and people.

Problem Sites

When mold spores drop where there is excessive moisture in your home, they will grow. Common problem sites include humidifiers, leaky roofs and pipes, overflowing sinks, bath tubs and plant pots, steam from cooking, wet clothes drying indoors, dryers exhausting indoors, or where there has been flooding.

Many of the building materials for homes provide suitable nutrients for mold, helping it to grow. Such materials include paper and paper products, cardboard, ceiling tiles, wood and wood products, dust, paints, wallpaper, insulation materials, drywall, carpet, fabric, and upholstery.

The importance of mold in the real estate market today

Much has been made of indoor mold in advertising and the media lately, so it’s a common concern for homeowners and buyers. It’s common to find mold even in new homes. Whether you’re selling your current home or looking into buying one, it’s vital to get a mold inspection. Presence of active mold can drastically affect the resale value of any home.

Know Before Selling

For homeowners, a mold inspection will either put your mind at rest or make you aware of any problems that could otherwise cause delays or deal breakers once you’ve entered negotiations with a buyer. A professional mold inspection will give you a signed report from an expert before you put the home up for sale. Imagine being able to show a “clean bill of health” to potential buyers that express concerns – they’ll be impressed by your thoroughness and commitment to your home.

Know Before Buying

For buyers, getting a mold inspection will ensure that you’re not surprised by costly clean up and the potential health hazards of mold. If any mold is found to be present and active in the home, the mold inspection will allow you to ask the seller to do the clean up prior to buying the home.

Exposure to Mold

Everyone is exposed to some amount of mold on a daily basis, most without any apparent reaction. Generally mold spores can cause problems when they are present in large numbers and a person inhales large quantities of them. This occurs primarily when there is active mold growth.
For some people, a small exposure to mold spores can trigger an asthma attack or lead to other health problems. For others, symptoms may only occur when exposure levels are much higher.
The health effects of mold can vary. The production of allergens or irritants can cause mild allergic reactions and asthma attacks. The production of potentially toxic mycotoxins can cause more severe reactions, and in rare cases death.

Should I be concerned about mold in my home?

Yes. If indoor mold is extensive, those in your home can be exposed to very high and persistent airborne mold spores. It is possible to become sensitized to these mold spores and develop allergies or other health concerns, even if one is not normally sensitive to mold.
Left unchecked, mold growth can cause structural damage to your home as well as permanent damage to furnishings and carpet.
According to the Centers for Disease Control*, “It is not necessary, however, to determine what type of mold you may have. All molds should be treated the same with respect to potential health risks and removal.”

Can my home be tested for mold?

Yes. We offer thorough mold inspections that involve visual examinations of the most likely areas to harbor mold. We also take air samples indoors and out to determine whether the number of spores inside your home is significantly higher. If the indoor level is higher, it could mean that mold is growing inside your home.

How do I remove mold from my home?

First address the source of moisture that is allowing the mold to grow. Then take steps to clean up the contamination. Here are helpful articles to learn more about cleaning up mold in your home.
” A Brief Guide to Mold, Moisture, and Your Home,” Environmental Protection Agency
” Repairing Your Flooded Home,” FEMA
” Controlling Mold Growth in the Home,”Kansas State University

*Sources: California Department of Health Services Indoor Air Quality Info Sheet, “Mold in My Home: What Do I Do?” revised July 2001; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “Questions and Answers on Stachybotrys chartarum and other molds” last reviewed November 30, 2002.

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